Dull the senses

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Image via Cecilia Par 

Alcohol dulls the senses. Movies dull the senses. Scrolling Twitter dulls the senses. These things relieve excess brain action, distracting us from the honesty of focus.

We don’t like to be stranded alone with our own thoughts because we’re scared of what they might say. But a little movement helps tame the monkey mind.

“To you, clerk, literary man, sedentary person, man of fortune, idler, the same advice. Up!” — Walt Whitman

That is to say, go for a walk. Take acknowledgment of the senses. Whatever exercises the body, relieves the mind.

Progress vs acceptance 

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Keep it lit. (Image via Anthony Delaniox)

What if instead of trying to get better, we improved upon the things that already existed?

We can become so obsessed with progress that we lose the fundamentals of what made things great in the first place.

Yes, living up to ideals is hard. But you accept the rules laid out in front of you, and then you try your hardest to live up to them.

Acceptance is the cornerstone of progress. The rest of the time is spent strengthening the system to ensure your actions line up to the intended beliefs.

The fixation with progress threatens what’s ideal. It’s moody and tempted toward nihilism. There’s no need to change what’s good if everything was right in the first place.

Cynicism is the easiest way to cop out. Even the pessimist doesn’t let things fall apart.

“The law of progress holds that everything now must be better than what was there before. Don’t you see if you want something better, and better, and better, you lose the good. The good is no longer even being measured.” — Hannah Arendt

Finding Your Purpose

Is it better to be told what to do and ride around the racetrack of life or remain goalless, floating with the tide?

“We do not strive to be firemen, we do not strive to be bankers, nor policemen, nor doctors. WE STRIVE TO BE OURSELVES…we must make the goal conform to the individual, rather than make the individual conform to the goal.”

To pick a goal is to assume that there’s an end. But we are always developing. Our perspective today is different than it was a decade ago, and so forth. Experience and knowledge change us.

Instead of searching for goals, Thompson implores, “look for a way of life. Decide how you want to live and then see what you can do to make a living WITHIN that way of life.”

All believing is betting. But God rewards the courageous. Almost always the assured outcome is the unique path we take ourselves. 

“No one HAS to do something he doesn’t want to do for the rest of his life. But then again, if that’s what you wind up doing, by all means convince yourself that you HAD to do it. You’ll have lots of company.”

Read Hunter S. Thompson Letter on Finding Your Purpose